Home

Why did images of white, nuclear families dominate television in the 1950s? Why has it taken nearly 70 years for images of a diverse America—featuring people of color, immigrants, women as independent social beings—to appear on prime time television?  Challenging the longstanding belief that what appeared on television screens in the 1950s and after resulted from some social consensus, The Broadcast 41 addresses these and other questions by telling two intersecting stories. The first story documents the heterogeneous perspectives of a generation of progressive women who had been…

Listen to this Studio 360 interview with actress Uta Hagen--great material on her commitment to civil rights. She was one of the youngest to be blacklisted in 1950. Like Stella Adler and Ray Lev, the blacklist curtailed their acting careers, making teaching one of the remaining ways they could make a living. …

Belafonte talks about how difficult it was for politically engaged performers of the era to voice their opinions and beliefs. Despite this, Lena Horne wrote outspoken articles about racism in media for the Harlem newspaper, The People's Voice, like the one below:

 

Lena Horne, From Me to You