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Why did images of white, nuclear families dominate television in the 1950s? Why has it taken nearly 70 years for images of a diverse America—featuring people of color, immigrants, women as independent social beings—to appear on prime time television?  Challenging the longstanding belief that what appeared on television screens in the 1950s and after resulted from some social consensus, The Broadcast 41 addresses these and other questions by telling two intersecting stories. The first story documents the heterogeneous perspectives of a generation of progressive women who had been…

A play--Finks--by Madeline Lee Gilford's son, Joe Gilford, examines the necessity--and cost--of fighting forces of fascism and demagoguery. 

He would know: his parents, Madeline Lee Gilford and Jack Gilford, bravely stood up to the blacklist despite intense FBI surveillance and retaliation.

There's a new off-Broadway play--Smart Blonde--about the incredible, funny, and brilliant Judy Holliday.

Holliday was in the comedy group the Revuers in Greenwich Village in the 1930s--Lillian Hellman was a fan! Gary Carey wrote a decent biography of Holliday--Judy Holliday: An Intimate Life Story (don't be totally put off by the title).